Category: Featured Winery

Sleight of Hand Cellars

 

ABOUT SLEIGHT OF HAND CELLARS

Sleight of Hand Cellars was founded in 2007 by Trey Busch and Jerry and Sandy Solomon. Our only goal from the outset has been to make world class wines while having the most fun that is legally possible. Our love of great wines from around the world, and our love of music, have inspired our vision and growth and have helped us reach a customer base that has the same passions as we do.

The winery has been open for just a dozen years, but in that time Sleight of Hand Cellars has been named one of “The Next Generation” of up and coming wineries in Washington State, as well as one of “The Next Cult Wineries” by Seattle Magazine. In addition, we have been featured in Wine Spectator magazine and had numerous wines in various of the industry’s “Top 100” lists, including, most recently, being named to the 2018 Wine Spectator Top 100 for our Levitation Syrah.

The Wine Advocate had this to say about our wines: “While I’ve always loved the wines from these guys, they’ve hit a new level recently, and the wines are now up there with the crème’ de la crème’ of the state (and beyond).”

These and other accolades forced our hand, and in 2011 the winery moved from a storefront location to its current property in southern Walla Walla where we continue to focus on the goal of making wines that compete with the best in the world, from a combination of Estate vineyards and non-estate vineyards in some of the top vineyard sites in Washington State. Upon acquiring our current property, the winery built a tasting room and production facility, and in 2014 we broke ground on a second barrel room to handle not only our increasing production levels, but also to allow us more space for more “toys” in keeping with our philosophy that every year offers an opportunity to make even better wines. In 2018, we crushed 164 tons of fruit, and we expect to bottle close to 10,000 cases of wine—which more than maxes out our current facility. With the past years’ increases in production, and our love for sharing our wines, in mid-2016 we began work on a tasting room in the SODO area of Seattle, which opened in August 2016.

Our tasting rooms are something everyone who loves wine and music should experience at least once (and hopefully often). We have over 2,000 albums from a wide range of musical genre, with turntables spinning vinyl in both of our tasting rooms as well in our new Wine Club Lounge at our Walla Walla property. Our love of ALL music inspires the wines we make (the production facility always has music—usually Seattle’s KEXP radio station–playing) as well as our marketing approach to reach our customers (we have the best winery t-shirts in the business). And our wine club, The Wine Illusionist Society, gets to enjoy our collaboration with one of our favorite music labels, Sub Pop Records in Seattle, because with each shipment we send them the latest and greatest songs on Sub Pop via digital download! 

Great wine, great music, and lots of fun—that’s our recipe for the Sleight of Hand lifestyle.

Source: Sleight of Hand Cellars

Prospice Wines

ABOUT PROSPICE

Prospice is the creation of two friends with a shared vision for wines and winemaking.  Each changed course from a prior professional career, drawn to winemaking by the impulse to craft an artisanal product.

At Prospice our focus is on making balanced and elegant wines that celebrate the source fruit and the vineyard sites.  We seek to roll back the clock on the modern trend toward riper, more extracted wines, preferring a lighter touch of oak and balanced extraction and alcohol.  We embrace modern scientific research into fermentation and aging, and the use of chemical analyses to understand and guide the production of the best wines we can possibly make from that fruit, but minimize the use of overly manipulative additives or techniques.  We use predominantly neutral oak barrels for aging, but employ a small number of new oak barrels — always of a carefully selected style and cooperage to complement the wine to be aged.

Throughout the process, the science, the analyses, the techniques, and the barrels are all ultimately in the service of the most subjective but most important tool we have:  our palate.  Ultimately, a wine is a small work of art in a bottle, and we seek to make each Prospice wine unique, expressive, and beautiful.

ABOUT THE NAME

Our name “Prospice,” from the Latin for “look to the future,” represents both our belief in the inherently optimistic and forward-looking nature of wine and winemaking and our respect for their deeply rooted traditions.  The clean, modern lines of the Prospice name in our logo sit in counterpoint to the lower rendering of the same name in ancient Etruscan characters (read from right to left), signifying this dichotomy of future and past.

Winemaking is full of moments of anticipation and expectation.  A grower who has found the perfect new vineyard site can close her eyes and see the rows of trellised vines that will eventually span the landscape.  Every year as spring arrives, grower and winemaker alike begin to roam the vineyard, carefully tracking the progress of budbreak, bloom, fruit set, veraison, ripening — ever envisioning the harvest that lies ahead.  As freshly-harvested fruit reaches the winery, the winemaker tastes and begins to envision the future of this incipient wine.  At every stage of ferment and aging, and as the wine goes into bottle, the winemaker recites an insistent and repeated mantra —  “I can’t wait to see what this wine becomes…” — whether in a year, two years, or twenty.

While winemaking is full of this future-oriented vision, there is also an unshakable reverence for the ancient origins of the craft.  The overwhelming majority of fine wine in modern times will spend at least some time in an oak barrel that would be entirely recognizable to a winemaker in Roman times.  Other ancient materials and techniques (such as concrete fermenters and clay amphorae) are experiencing a huge resurgence in modern wineries.  Where the geology supports it, many wineries still age wines in caves hewn from solid rock.  In spite of multiple alternatives that are arguably superior in every way, winemakers and consumers alike still cling stubbornly to the use of cork to seal wine bottles.

Prospice — the name and the winery — is a celebration of the past, of all the years of experience that have brought the winemaking craft to where it is today, and a means to carry that craft into an exciting future.  We hope you will join us for the adventure.

 

Source Prospice Wines